10 Comments to “PROGRESS SEQUENCE. Small Skull”


  1. dougzuber — August 29, 2008 @ 4:58 am

    HI

    How does one purchase one of these skulls? pls reply to dougzuber@gmail.com

  2. Lola — November 8, 2008 @ 3:25 pm

    Hi, I’m an artist just getting into glass casting. I have a studio with two large electric Skutt kilns. I have had some success but many failures using the lost wax method. I had been using Bullseye Glass but was recently told Gaffer Glass is the best. If you would be interested in sharing your knowledge, I would LOVE to learn all I can about this medium. I will leave my e-mail address and web-site. Thank you for your time.
    e-mail: sculpture@margaretwarren.com
    Website: http://www.margaretwarren.com

  3. admin — November 16, 2008 @ 11:39 pm

    Hi Lola,
    It is in the observing of the comparisons between the perceived ‘good’ and ‘bad’ that these experiences teach us how to control the media more to our desires.

    And yes! Raw material does play a large role in the quality of a cast. From experience Gaffer Glass is the undoubted choice. This is a 40% lead crystal specifically developed for casting.

    Donn

  4. How-To: Make a glass skull by lost wax casting | Diy all the Way — August 25, 2009 @ 5:01 am

    […] Glasskulls.com, though short on “who,” is long on “how,” featuring nice big, clear photos illustrating the process of going from wax master to finished art glass casting. Inferring from the scattered comments, I think the artist’s name is “Donn.” If so: Nice work, Donn, and thanks for showing us how it’s done. […]

  5. How-To: Make a glass skull by lost wax casting - machine quotidienne — August 25, 2009 @ 6:13 am

    […] Glasskulls.com, though short on “who,” is long on “how,” featuring nice big, clear photos illustrating the process of going from wax master to finished art glass casting. Inferring from the scattered comments, I think the artist’s name is “Donn.” If so: Nice work, Donn, and thanks for showing us how it’s done. […]

  6. Shop Club Blog » Blog Archive » How-To: Make a glass skull by lost wax casting — August 25, 2009 @ 10:31 am

    […] Glasskulls.com, though short on “who,” is long on “how,” featuring nice big, clear photos illustrating the process of going from wax master to finished art glass casting. Inferring from the scattered comments, I think the artist’s name is “Donn.” If so: Nice work, Donn, and thanks for showing us how it’s done. […]

  7. Cross Links 25 August 2009 // Materials & Technology for Designers // Material Ocean // Material Ocean — August 25, 2009 @ 3:31 pm

    […] Progressive illustration of kiln casting, small lead crystal skulls – “A low tech, backyard casting sequence from a small sculpture studio nestled in isolated, bush clad hills of New Zealand’s Northland.” – Via Make. […]

  8. forvvard — February 22, 2010 @ 10:58 pm

    Hi! Thank you for this page!
    It’s fantastic! I would like to try to make glass cube.
    But i don’t understand exactly…

    “The elementary mold mix is one kg of gypsum, one kg of silicon flour to one liter of water.”

    What is “silicon flour”?
    Silicon, like an inplant? Or silicium (SI)? Or what?
    Please, give me some information as soon as possible!
    Tnx: Dewill

  9. admin — February 23, 2010 @ 10:34 am

    Silica Flour. Silica is silicon dioxide, SiO2 ….. Available in 20 kg bags.
    It is used as the refractory ingredient to prevent the gypsum from breaking down in the kiln environment. No more than 50% mix with the gypsum otherwise the plaster becomes too weak to hold when red hot. Top heat 950c maximum for no more than 5 hours before mold will start to deteriorate. Recommended is 850c up to 12 hours….. this time is relevant to size of object….. general rule is half an hour per 1/4 inch, more is recommended. So a piece an inch thick is fired at top temp. for a minimum of 2 hours….. 3 would be better.

  10. Casting Glass Skulls · Glass Art | CraftGossip.com — November 4, 2011 @ 7:02 am

    […] Thanks to the Gaffer Girls for this post. As I keep mentioning, I’m totally into glass casting!! Love love love it!! So when I see something about it I can share with all of you you know I will. Today you’ll see the process to make glass skulls. The casting process does scare people away because it has quite a few steps and can be fairly time consuming. So watch the process…over at glassskulls.com!! […]



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Kiln Cast Lead Crystal Skulls